Spelling races with mini-whiteboards

I don’t do enough spelling practice. I should develop in that area, definitely. But one fun thing I do is a simple whiteboard spelling game as a review.

Give each team (about 4 students) a mini whiteboard, pen, eraser. Say one of the target words, and students spell it on the board. But…

  • Each student can only write one letter
  • They must then pass the board to their left
  • The next student writes the next letter
  • Students can collaborate over the spelling
  • When they’ve completed the word they hold the board up. The first team to finish gets a point.

Not got mini whiteboards? Just use a laminated piece of paper and some tissue as the rubber.

One team keeps winning…

Ha! Always happens. The game is just for fun. If a team keeps winning just get them to use their wrong hand to write each letter! Educational value, a bit. Fun and hilarity, plenty.

Alternative:

On our CELTA YL course one teacher put piles of letters (cut up) on each desk. He said a word and students worked together to construct it using the letters. One student tended to take over, but you could introduce some rules to prevent this.

I’m writing a series of short posts in response to Martin Sketchley’s blog challenge. You can view his new blog here.



Categories: Lesson Ideas, teacher development, vocabulary

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

9 replies

  1. I shared this spelling game which you might like a long time ago on my blog: https://sandymillin.wordpress.com/2012/04/17/spelling-game/ Enjoying these little posts 🙂
    Sandy

    Liked by 1 person

  2. For YLs – I’ve found fridge magnet letters work better than cut ups – more sturdy!

    Like

  3. Loved it ! Thanks! I’ll use it with my students on Monday.

    Like

  4. Just brilliant! There is something in your style I love it, and the fact that you share your wisdom, as well as your knowledge, with your readers.
    Spelling practice for kids

    Like

Trackbacks

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