Learning to read the world through other eyes

I’ve just come across this booklet as part of the reading on the PGCEi at the University of Nottingham. It’s a brilliant open access resource for exploring global citizenship. It offers a series of cross-cultural exercises, which help learners to…

  • develop understanding of different belief systems and values
  • explore how these values may impact of development agendas
  • examine western and indigenous interpretations of notions such as equality, education and poverty
  • consider ways to improve dialogue and mutual learning.

The resource is a reflective tool for educators, but equally useful as a classroom resource for learners (well, depends on your context I guess). This would be a really engaging topic for my secondary class (teens, Thailand, aged 14-17, B1+) and there is scope to adapt it to local contexts.

Here’s the conceptual framework that the activities are based on (taken from Andreotti and Souza 2008:4)

Each activity in the booklet is clearly staged. They first involve exploring your own perspective on a notion (i.e. poverty), then considering the perspectives of others. A case study is provided, which frames such perspectives within a real-world context. Learners then discuss further, reflect on what they’ve discovered, and consider the impact of this – such as potential transformations to government policy and practice.

The perspectives offered on certain topics (via quotes) could form discussion lessons, and there is so much learning that could take place through this book. There are some interesting themes explored, such as the importance of situated knowledge – something we’ve been exploring a lot on our course recently.

It’s over 10 years old, so I’m a bit late with this one. But if you haven’t come across this resource before it’s definitely worth a look!

Download the resource here:

Andreotti, V., & de Souza, L. M. T. M. (2008). Learning to read the world: Through other eyes. Global Education.

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